2014 NORRA 1000

Silverstate 300 Photo Gallery

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NORRA 1000: 1928 Willy’s Whippet

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It all started two years ago and  rebuilding the Willy’s took more time than I thought. I changed the suspension three times, I changed the motor mounts ten times, the radiator was moved at least 3 times and the list goes on. Butch Burtness changed the timing cover 3 times in order to change from the EFI motor to a carburetor motor. The installing of the serpentine belt created its own complications. I worked many weekends and would not have been ready for the Norra 1000 without the help of Butch and Stewart Dixon.

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Projects get started everyday, few are completed. Overcoming some of the obstacles have been very challenging.  Working with a frame of almost 100 years created many limitations. Each component had to be redesigned to merge the old with the new. For example, adding a 4 link suspension to a very narrow framed car caused us to create a link connection along the outside of the front frame and somewhat traditional in the rear.

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But I couldn’t give up, the April 27, 2013 deadline for the Norra 1000 was approaching fast. I knew that if this project didn’t get finished this year, it may never get finished. There is always more to complete, change this or fix that, but we made it!

2013 NORRA 1000
There are so many people to thank. J.R. and Dana Leaner who had the Whippet sitting it a pile in Idyllwild and sold it to us. Mogi, who built the transmission. The rebuilt engine came from Power Train – a 97 Ford explorer. And of course, the driveline was built by Inland Driveline. The front and rear axles came from Sierra Towing in San Bernardino. I have Summit Racing on my quick dial list and Ebay motors has burned a hole in my lap top screen. The final body work and custom paint was done by Jim’s in Temecula. Fabrication, roll cage, floor, welding and creating new parts and pieces to fill in the gaps done by Gary and Stewart Dixon. Butch Burtness completed the brakes and wiring, motor plumbing etc.  And we can’t forget our tire sponsor, we have General Tires on everything we race.

I am now on my way to Baja!

Gary

2012 BITD Blue Water Desert Challenge

Parker Arizona…….We came, we saw, we got defeated…….again!!

Thursday morning, Stewart showed up with the truck, ready to qualify for the 2012 BITD Blue Water Desert Challenge. We showed up at the Blue Water Casino to register for the race as well as qualifying. We were set to start fourth in qualifying. We arrived back at the truck and began prepping it for qualifying. We added a splash of fuel, just enough for the 3 mile qualifying lap, removing the rear tires to lighten the truck enough to hopefully gain some ground.  The rain was relentless. Mother Nature decided to open up and water down the track, adding for a little dust control.  It didn’t help. Our first lap around was good. It was definitely a lot better than our second lap. Due to the heavy rains, the generator that Casey Folks was using to operate the red and green lights at the start line, malfunctioned and we probably lost a few seconds at the start line.  Due to unknown reasons Casey combined the 7200 class and the 1000 class vehicles together. All in all, we settled for a 13th place qualifying spot, starting next the 12th place starter, Randy Merritt, #7281 of KC HiLites/Mongo Racing. 

Saturday morning, October 13th, we enjoyed watching the 1st race and then began setting the truck up for the race. Completing our normal, pre-race check list, the truck was ready. Stewart Dixon got into the driver’s seat and Derek Dixon was navigating. They warmed the truck up and staged for the 3rd race. Staging was at 9:45am and race time was 10:15am.  We lined up and hung out with the Lost Boys crew, waiting for the time to start our engines and take to the start line. 10:15a.m. rolls around and we start the race next to Randy Merritt. We got the green light and the race has begun! The start of the race was more set up for buggies and not a 6,000 pound truck with a 540 horse power engine. We were bogging down and bogging down bad. We lost off the start line to Mongo Racing but this was about combined times. We still had Sundays to race to better our final position. The truck was holding up. The race course was a 3 lap race. The first and second laps were 26 mile loops with the last lap being 21 miles for a total of 73 miles. We were keeping a average pace at an average of 33 minutes a lap.  Stewart and Derek passed Gary Dixon, Jeff McCullough and Kevyn Thaxton in the hot pit, while they were yelling into the PCI radio, it was difficult to understand what Stewart was saying. We attempted to reach them but they were gone. We were going to finish the first race! Looks like Parker isn’t going to get us this time.. WRONG! We went to the Ford Mesa, to watch the 7200 class trucks and 1000 vehicles come to the finish line. At 1 hour and 39 minutes, Lost Boys #7205 unlimited Ford crossed the finish line. Unfortunately, Parker beat us again at their own race….AGAIN!! Four turns from the finish line, Stewart heard a pop in the engine and lost all horsepower. They pulled it into the Ford Mesa, smoke billowing from the engine breather. We were done! We burned up our piston rings. Will there ever be a moment where Lost Boys Racing will beat Parker Arizona at its own race? Stay tuned for the Parker 425 in February.

We hung out at camp and enjoyed everyone’s company. We barbequed! We ate! We had a good time with friends and family. The kids had a great time swimming in the river, and we relaxed. Lost Boys Racing may have lost the 2012 BITD Blue Water Desert Challenge, but having our friends and family out there, cheering us on, WE WON! Next on our agenda, 2012 BITD Henderson 250, November 30th-December 2nd.

Stay Tuned for Blue Water Challenge photos coming soon.

NORRA 1000-1200

NORRA 1000-1200

What does it take to finish a race like this?
• Patience
• Attention to detail
• Concentration for hours at a time
• Automotive background
• Friends & family
• Luck, prayer, and determination
• Overcome change quickly
• Navigational skills
• Logistics: Food, water, gas, tires, radio, etc.
• Faith in vehicle and knowledge of what it can handle.

You can rearrange this anyway you what but if you’re missing one item you are not going to finish.

Click on the photo above to see a full slideshow.

Day 1
After leaving the bullring in Mexicali I knew we were in for a long four days. The steering was terrible on the asphalt, changing lanes without notice. The motor was branch new, only three hours and the break in oil was still in it. Jeff is going to keep the RPM’s down to day. But the car is running great. Already, I notice the noise from the body is driving me crazy. I keep looking back to see is the rear of the car is still there. We are headed to the Bay of LA and would like to be there before dark.

Day 2
I will drive today giving Jeff a brake, I soon realize that this car is not going to handle one mistake. A zero tolerance driving is now in effect, I will keep it under 80 mph and on the road at all times. I need to complete 408 miles today. We arrive in Loreto Bay around 6pm. The taco bar is open, the pool looks great, and Sarah Palin is upstairs in the suite we had last year (no kidding.) This year we are staying at La Luna behind the Mission Inn, the owner here takes good care of us.

Day 3
I am up at 5am taking pictures again then some maintenance on the AMC. Change the air cleaner and fix the door locks and we are ready to do it again. Today will be the hardest day. 400 more miles to go. I ask Jeff is he wanted me to drive again today and he could drive across the finish line tomorrow. Just after the start, both latches break on the rear hatch. We are not stopping, maybe we can make it through the stage. 30 miles later, the hinge breaks and the hatch is in my rearview mirror, swinging. It is now a General Tire monument on top of a 3000’ mountain in Baja. We should have left the hatch at the start line. The car feels lighter now and it’s cooler inside. It’s a long day but we pull into La Paz on time with no penalties. We are staying at the Marina Bay Inn in La Paz. After a quick swim and a great Bloody Mary we are off to dinner with Mom, Tony, Jeff, and I.

Day 4
I am up at 3am, the Edsel is pulling into the parking lot. I think they broke down yesterday. Today starts with a 56 mile transit section then a 140 mile race to the finish in Cabo. At the end of every day people ask what’s in our car. Today my answer is a grenade and I already pulled the pin. Jeff is driving today, it is a very difficult course, no mistakes allowed. We drift wide and there is a ditch in front of the car. I started yelling, “stop!“ and the car stalls and won’t turn over, the starter is hot. Jeff probably would have missed the ditch, I was being overcautious. Ten minutes later, it starts and we’re off again 50 miles to go. Where is the fuel stop? The GPS isn’t tracking mileage and I don’t know where we are, Mag 7 has 22 gallons of fuel for us but they are not here. We eventually run out of the gas just past checkpoint 12. I am going to run back to the road for gas one mile. There is no gas here but someone will drive me into town to pick up five gallons of fuel. By the time I return Jeff has the car at the road and a motorcycle also needs gas. We both fuel up but because we don’t have a GPS with mileage we have to drive back into town again and top off the fuel cell. One hour later, we are back in the race. We soon realize we are only miles to the finish line. Police on every corner and we are here. Three trips in the AMC Hornet and three finishes. 2nd in class. 19th overall.

Mint 400 Part 2

Trying to race three cars wasn’t the best idea.  We ended up going in too many directions.  Since two of the cars were in the morning race we were up early getting Derek and Jeff started then we were off to pit #2 but we also needed people at the main pit to prep the 7200 truck,  It worked out fine but some things were sacrificed.

Derek completed the race in 14th overall and 1st in class.  The class 9 prep by Doug, Stewart, and Butch paid off.  Derek drove at a conservative pace which paid off and still finished 14th.  Jeff and the AMC Hornet were off to a bad start, leaking through a bad oil cooler behind the seats.  I think they could have finished the race but would have probably finished the car.  We weren’t aware  of it but the motor was seizing.  1 ½ laps or 150 miles and they are out.  The car lived to race another day.

At noon it was time to race the 7200 truck pre-stage behind the railroad tracks.  We were set to race around 1:30 pm.  It was a side by side start.  Our truck locked up quickly by the 1st turn and we were out front by three truck lengths.  As we made the last turn to go out into the desert we hit the soft sand and our 5700 lb truck turns into a bulldozer.  540 HP going to waste in a truck that is too heavy for this part of the course.  We were passed up quickly.

Back on the hard pack we were picking up speed but something is different about the truck.  What is this? At the top of every roller there is a sharp jolt going right through our backs.  What is this?  Never mind, just man up and race.  Sort the same mentality as not asking for directions when you’re lost.

The truck is fast and we passed vehicles already while making our 5th pass in 20 miles.  We clipped one of the trucks with the front end.  It mostly filled the engine compartment with rocks because it rolled the power steering belt off the pulley and turned the belt inside out.

We needed to change the belts on a very hot engine including the alternator belt which was in the way.  It took 30-45 minutes to fix then we are back up to speed again behind a white truck at 40-50 MPH.  The truck in front of us clips a large rock and spun it under us taking out two tires only 10 minutes later.  You can see where this day is going.

Changed two tires and were off.  This was still lap one and three more to go.  The truck tops out at about 115 MPH and the adjustment Stewart made to our cooling system is working great full throttle and we are hitting 210 degrees on lap two.

Something was still wrong with our set up and my back felt it.  But I hadn’t figured it out.  The rear end lets go on lap two.  We snapped the locating arm bolt.  To fix this under load we needed to lift the rear end of the truck off the ground.  We stacked up two tires under the rear bumper and placed our jack under that to raise up the whole rear end and put in a new bolt.  We were going to drive into pit one and fix it again.  After asking everyone for parts fixed again with the right bolts and misaligned cams.

At this point Stewart was already done keeping this truck together, it’s becoming a full time job and without any finishes no one cares if we go.

We are off to the main pit to finish lap two and the rear end breaks again for the same reason.  We rolled into the main pit and got out.  We are done now, the arm is also almost through the fuel cell this time.

What did we change this race?  The compression on all four corners too loosen up the suspension and use every inch of travel we have.  It was the wrong choice for the track and both the truck and I paid the price-  my back locked up on me and I couldn’t stand up straight for two days.

Why didn’t we stop and fix this during the race??

Our next race is the NORRA 1000 in Baja.

 

 

The Mint 400 Photo Gallery


Click on the photo above for a full slideshow.